DigibitVPN does a lot well, from speeds and encryption, to DDoS protection and unlimited devices. But in the end, it’s a frustrating package that doesn’t quite enter the VPN elite.

Sprinting out of the traps with a promise to deliver lightning fast speeds, zero logs, and “maximum security,” the BVI’s DigibitVPN makes a good first impression – but does it go any further than that?

With features like unlimited P2P downloads, specialist DDoS protection for gamers, workarounds for ISP blocking, and unlimited device connections, this is a service which has thought about what customers need. And it backs that up with top-of-the-line encryption and other security features.

In other words, though it might not be the best known provider around, Digibit is one to watch, and it’s well worth getting to know in more detail, so let’s do that.

Security and privacy

Firstly, let’s start this DigibitVPN review with the number one priority of any good Virtual Private Network: security and privacy. If a provider fails here, it fails everywhere.

Fortunately, that’s not really the case with Digibit, which offers the following general security features:

  • 256-bit military grade AES encryption
  • A kill switch to ensure you’re covered at all times
  • No third-party servers, ensuring Digibit is in total control
  • Anonymous payments via Bitcoin and 50 other cryptocurrencies
  • Very clear zero logs commitment

That’s basically a good foundation, including the core elements that we’d look for in a solid VPN, so kudos to Digibit for getting those building blocks in the right place. And it follows them up with reliable DNS leak protection. Combined with the use of its own DNS servers and switches, this should mean that your ISP, hackers, or state spooks won’t have any idea of your browsing habits.

The kill switch is a welcome addition (especially when you regularly download via P2P servers). It’s mysteriously absent from lower-quality VPNs, and it’s the kind of thing that reassures us that there’s nothing malicious under the hood.

The only information missing here relates to protocols. Digibit isn’t forthcoming about how it creates VPN tunnels,and it takes some digging to discover that the company uses OpenVPN, via either UDP or TCP connections – nothing to be worried about.

And customers should note that there’s no StealthVPN capability and no TOR compatibility. While it’s solid, Digibit is definitely not an all-round privacy tool for experienced users.

Does DigibitVPN keep logs?

DigibitVPN is very vocal about its zero logs policy, which is great. But we’ve seen plenty of providers whose claims don’t match reality. Is that the case here?

Users do have to provide some information when they sign up, which hardly unusual in the world of VPNs. As we noted earlier, you can get around some of this via cryptocurrency payments, and aside from that all DigibitVPN request is an email. You don’t get much more anonymous than that.

More importantly, DigibitVPN will record the times you connect to the VPN, the server you choose, and the amount of data you consume. That last clause is interesting, as it suggests that the company tracks data usage in quite a bit of detail. But beyond that, there’s nothing too alarming in the privacy policy – at least nothing that marks DigibitVPN out from the crowd.

The BVI jurisdiction is another assuring aspect of Digibit’s service. Generally speaking, BVI-based providers have a spotless privacy record, and the authorities there are well aware of the need to ensure client privacy. So, overall we’d have to say that the company delivers on its logging claims.

Speed and performance

Anytime a Virtual Private Network promises lightning fast speeds, it’s worth being deeply skeptical. We’ve heard far too many claims about connection speed, and most of the time providers can’t deliver.

Happily, this DigibitVPN review can report that’s not the case here. While we wouldn’t describe the download speed as “lightning fast,” we did try numerous servers from the 36-server network, and most delivered a respectable download speed.

It was easily fast enough for YouTube streaming, and managed pretty well for Fortnite, as well on an Android smartphone. Our speed test found 50% dropoffs in upload speed on some occasions, but the vast majority of tests saw 40-55% dropoffs – if that. So this is a competitive provider when it comes to speed.

Server coverage

As we mentioned above, DigibitVPN only offers a choice of 36 servers. These servers are located in the UK, Germany, France, the USA, the Philippines, Canada, Ukraine, India, Hong Kong, Sweden, Taiwan, and Slovakia. So there are plenty of gaps around the world. Most obviously, the company’s Latin American coverage is minimal, there’s nothing in Africa, and not that much in East Asia or the Middle East.

Fundamentally, DigibitVPN is appealing to European and North American customers, with a few global locations here and there. Nevertheless, the Indian servers are handy and not all that common with mass market VPNs, and the inclusion of a Hong Kong server is useful for those visiting China.

Ease of use and multiplatform support

DigibitVPN scores pretty well when it comes to accessibility and multi-platform coverage, with the ability for customers to download the app across plenty of systems and devices. Here are the main options:

  • Android
  • iOS
  • Windows
  • Routers
  • Amazon Fire Stick
  • Linux
  • Mac
  • Smart TVs

This looks great, but customers should note that you can only download the client for smartphones, Fire Stick, and Windows PCs. For anything else, users will have to access Digibit via an OpenVPN login – which the company is happy to assist with. So don’t be deceived – Digibit may not be quite as easy to use as it looks.

There aren’t any browser extensions, either, just a service for PC desktops and Android or iPhone apps. That’s probably not a deal breaker for most people, but it would be a neat addition to the company’s offer.

As for the actual client, getting up and running is very simple. There’s a comprehensive download page, with FAQs and support if needed, but that probably won’t be necessary. It’s just a question of downloading the client, firing it up, choosing a server, then pressing Connect. There aren’t many customizable options, for good or bad, so it’s great for entry-level users.

Unblocking Netflix and other streaming platform

For many people, a VPN is useless if it can’t handle geo-blocking. Many companies use this technology nowadays, allowing them to segment their audience for digital rights reasons, or to charge the maximum price different markets will bear. For instance, although you may not know it, Netflix and Hulu routinely do so, limiting the amount of content available to users.

In our experience, DigibitVPN gives you a decent chance of beating geo-restriction techniques, but it’s not infallible. In the past, the company has struggled to work around Netflix restrictions, and its ability to do so fluctuates, so you might be lucky. However, there are more reliable unblockers around. Having said that, we found the Digibit works well with the BBC iPlayer and fools YouTube’s geo-filters effectively.

Another plus is that the company caters well for Amazon Fire Stick users. You’ll find a certified version of the VPN on the Amazon Fire Store, which is always a good sign. This means that installing the app won’t be too tricky. Roku or other Kodi streaming devices may be slightly more complex, but if users contact Digibit, they are happy to lead users through the steps involved.

P2P and torrenting

Not all VPNs embrace torrenting. In fact, most are outright hostile towards P2P downloaders, seeing them as a legal liability and a drain on their servers. That’s not the case with DigibitVPN, which proudly states that it has no issues with P2P downloaders at all.

Well, it states that in its marketing material. The reality is more complicated. As the Terms of Service notes, “Sending, transmitting or receiving any illegal content over the Service” is grounds for instant contract termination. However, given the VPN’s logging policy, it has a way of knowing whether any illegality has taken place.

Despite this, we found that Digibit offered a reliable avenue for secure torrenting, and there was generally no problem establishing a secure P2P connection. Speeds weren’t stellar, but that’s to be expected. Unfortunately, the company doesn’t offer a SOCKS5 proxy, which may have boosted speeds somewhat, but at least it welcomes P2P, unlike some others. And finally, users should welcome the inclusion of a kill switch, which lessens the risk of P2P downloading considerably.

Online censorship in China and elsewhere

Digibit promises “unrestricted access to the internet” wherever users happen to be. However, that probably doesn’t extend to China, where only very few VPNs are able to breach the Great Firewall.

While the company does operate in the Chinese market, it doesn’t include StealthVPN, a feature which tends to make it harder for censorship to detect Virtual Private Networks. The IP anonymization and encryption provided may offer superficial protection, but we’re skeptical whether Digibit will be the antidote to online surveillance Chinese users need. At least, in comparison to trusted alternatives like NordVPN.

Customer support

In the world of VPNs, support varies wildly. Even some of the industry’s biggest players sometimes leave users high and dry, lacking information they need to make the most of their service. DigibitVPN does moderately well in this regard.

Here are the basic customer support options available for users:

  • FAQs
  • The Client Area (basically a type of user forum)
  • Phone support
  • Live chat
  • Email
  • Online customer feedback form

When added together, that’s a neat mix of live support options and information archives. It’s certainly a wider range of contact options than most equivalent VPNs, and the inclusion of a direct phone line is particularly refreshing.

That doesn’t just show that Digibit are willing to interact with customers. It also shows that the company is fairly transparent, and probably isn’t concealing nasty surprises here and there. We like that approach.

However, the email ticketing system can be a little slow at times, and the FAQs lean heavily towards corporate clients (for Digibit’s marketing services, which are the company’s main operations). Finding information about things like protocols or servers is harder than it should be, so we couldn’t give the provider a faultless score here. It’s a work in progress that gets a lot right.

Pricing

The first thing to note about pricing is that Digibit prices everything in GBP (pounds), which shouldn’t be an issue for North American purchasers, but may take some mathematics to make the conversion. When you’ve done that, you’ll find that the tariffs are pretty reasonable.

There’s basically one package available, which charges £2.50 per month (around $3.27).

That’s an appealing monthly rate. The company doesn’t offer annual or semi-annual contracts, which is extremely unusual. The company will auto-renew a user’s coverage every month, which seems like an unnecessarily prescriptive business model – especially for what amounts to a decent product.

Moreover, there’s no free version of Digibit’s client, and no free trial. That’s another huge red mark against the company, and something good VPNs almost always offer. After all, every connection is different, and privacy is a serious business. It’s strange that Digibit don’t realize that.

Additionally, Digibit isn’t very keen to issue refunds. The Terms and Conditions states that refunds “will be considered, in the sole discretion of DigibitVPN,” putting the responsibility on users to prove that servers weren’t available, or unusably slow. That doesn’t sound to us like a recipe for a seamless, hassle-free money-back guarantee.

Bottom line

With excellent security features, a P2P-friendly policy, the ability to use unlimited devices, coverage of a wide range of platforms, respectable speeds, and a generally user-friendly client, you would expect DigibitVPN to score very highly. And it’s definitely a worthwhile choice for those who need a lightweight, efficient Windows, iOS or Android privacy tool.

However, strangely unprofessional payment systems, and a generally vague support system count against it, while weak Netflix unblocking is another important negative. So the bottom line? Try, but don’t expect miracles.